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West Michigan Airport Infrastructure

Gerald R. Ford International Airport (GRR)

General Information

  • The airport operates three runways:
    1. Main East/West runway – 150 ft. wide x 10,000-ft. long
    2. Parallel East/West runway – 100 ft. wide x 5,000-ft. long
    3. North/South runway – 150 ft. wide x 8,501 ft. long
  • The airport covers nearly 3,200 acres (over five square miles).
  • The airport’s passenger terminal building is just over 240,850 square feet; with over 170,000 square feet open to the public.
  • The airport operates its own police, fire, and maintenance departments.
  • There are two concourses and 13 gates in the passenger terminal building.

Passenger Air Travel

Gerald R. Ford International Airport is served by five passenger airlines with 120 daily scheduled nonstop flights to and from 24 major market destinations.

  • Over 7,200 travelers pass through Gerald R. Ford International Airport each day.
  • 2.6 Million passengers traveled through Gerald R. Ford International Airport in 2017.
  • Gerald R. Ford International Airport is the 79th busiest commercial airport in the nation and the second busiest airport in Michigan.

Freight Air

  • There are two cargo airlines located at Gerald R. Ford International.
  • More than 241,600 pounds of air cargo pass through Gerald R. Ford International Airport each day, more than 121 tons per day!
  • More than 88 million pounds of air cargo passed through Gerald R. Ford International Airport in 2017.

Other Information

  • Nearly 1,500 people work at the airport, the majority being employed by airport tenants.
  • The airport generates $3.1 billion in economic output for the West Michigan region.
  • Gerald R. Ford International Airport is managed and operated by the Kent County Department of Aeronautics.
  • The Gerald R. Ford International Airport Board is a seven-member body appointed by the Kent County Board of Commissioners with responsibility for policy setting and general oversight of the airport.
  • The airport is financially self-supporting and receives no funding from property taxes, general funds, or special taxes. Airport operations and improvements generate local net airport revenue, rather than spend valuable tax dollars.
  • GFIA’s capital requirements are met through various sources including earned surpluses, revenue bonds, passenger facility charges, and grants under the federal Airport Improvement Program and the Michigan state aviation grant program. Operational requirements are met through rates and charges assessed to airport tenants and airport patrons for the use of airport services and facilities.